Jordan 'must investigate alleged prison torture'

Jordan 'must investigate alleged prison torture'
2 min read
05 November, 2015
Analysis: Amman has been asked to immediately investigate allegations that Amer Jubran is serving a 10-year sentence based on a "confession" made under torture.
Judges failed to respond to claims Jubran had been tortured in custody [Getty]

Amer Jubran is serving a ten-year sentence based on a "confession" he says was made under torture, according to human rights organisations calling on Amman authorities to immediately investigate the allegations.

Jubran, a Jordanian man of Palestinian descent, should be the focus of an impartial and independent inquiry, said Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch.

"Such an investigation should identify if torture and other crimes took place, and, if there is enough admissible evidence, to lead to the individuals suspected of having ordered, carried out and otherwise participated in such acts being brought to justice," read a joint statement from the groups.

     Jubran's lawyer says the defendant was forced to sign more than 100 'statements' without reading them


Jubran is currently waiting for a ruling by Jordan's highest court on his case.

The human rights groups have urged Jubran be given a fair and prompt retrial in accordance with international standards if his allegations are proven correct.

On 7 October 2015, Amnesty International wrote to the Jordanian government asking for clarifications about the allegations of torture and ill treatment, and expressing concern Jubran had not received a fair trial. As of 3 November, Amnesty had not received a reply, said Human Rights Watch.

Jubran was convicted on 29 July by Jordan's State Security Court on charges including planning attacks against US soldiers in Jordan, being a member of the Lebanese group Hizballah, and possessing firearms and explosives.

He was sentenced to 15 years in prison, which may be reduced to ten years with hard labour.

The judges, however, failed to respond to claims he had been tortured and ill-treated while in custody and forced to make a confession.

Jubran's lawyer says the defendant was forced to sign more than 100 "statements" without reading them. Some of these were used as evidence against him in the trial, said HRW.

The ruling is pending appeal before the Court of Cassation on the grounds that the conviction was unproven and his confession was forced.