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Turkey warns The Netherlands of 'consequences' following minister's deportation

Erdogan is furious following the Netherlands snub of Turkish ministers [AFP]

Date of publication: 12 March, 2017

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Tensions between The Netherlands and Turkey have reached fever pitch after a Turkish minister was expelled from the country.
Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened the Netherlands during a speech on Sunday, saying the European country would "pay a price" for expelling a Turkish minister.

"Hey Holland! If you are sacrificing Turkish-Dutch relations for the sake of the elections on Wednesday, you will pay a price," Erdogan told supporters.

"They will learn what diplomacy is," he growled, adding that what happened "cannot remain unanswered."

Turkey is furious about a decision by The Netherlands to deport its Family Minister Fatma Betul Sayan Kaya following he plans to speak to supporters in Rotterdam.

She said he was treated "inhumanely" by Dutch authorities on her return to Istanbul.

The Netherlands also denied Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu permission to land in the country on Sunday heating tensions between the two countries further.

Cavusoglu warned The Netherlands of "consequences" for its actions, and said an apology by its NATO ally "wouldn't be enough" to quell tensions.

"We have other steps in mind. We've already begun planning them. We will certainly take those steps and more."

It comes after Turkey faced a backlash from some EU states - including The Netherlands - for attempting to suppress pro-Ankara rallies atteneded by Turkish ministers.

Turkey is attempting to win support of Turkish-Europeans for a referendum on whether to grant the president further powers.

The Netherlands' prime minister has said that the voters are Dutch citizens, not Turkish, and pro-Ankara rallies attended by ministers threaten public security.

Agencies contributed to this story.

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