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Cash-strapped Lebanon criticised for 'costly' anti-cheating cameras in schools

Lebanon is struggling not just with soaring debt, but rising unemployment and slow growth [Getty]

Date of publication: 27 May, 2019

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Lebanese social media users have criticised a government project to curb students cheating on exams by installing cameras in schools.

Lebanese social media users have criticised a government project that hopes to stop students cheating on exams by installing cameras in schools.

Twitter users in the cash-strapped country slammed the high-cost measure, which comes as the government discusses measures to rescue an economy crumbling under debt.

Education Minister Akram Chehayeb toured schools last week to inspect the ongoing installation of the cameras in examination rooms.

"Cameras are a control tool that exists in classrooms in civilised countries throughout the academic year - not just at the time of exams," Chehayeb was quoted as saying by local newspaper The Daily Star.

"We are not making a mistake but taking a step to put students at ease and give them his rights," he added.

According to the newspaper, the project is expected to cost the government about $800,000.

The minister has also justified the need for cameras by saying that austerity measures, which are expected to be part of a long-awaited budget, will reduce the number of exam observers.

Twitter users have panned the plan as overly costly and unnecessary.

"It would have been a better idea to install fans and heaters for the students who actually need them," said one commenter.

Others questioned the need for exams in the first place, calling them a "waste of time".

Lebanon is struggling not just with soaring debt, but rising unemployment and slow growth.

Authorities have been meeting for weeks to discuss a budget for this year, which aims to avert a financial crisis by cutting public spending and reducing the ballooning deficit.

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