Donald Trump may introduce a 'Muslim registry'

Donald Trump may introduce a 'Muslim registry'
2 min read
17 November, 2016
Donald Trump is discussing the possibility of introducing a registry to keep track of Muslims in the US with his White House transition team, according to a senior advisor.
Donald Trump suggested creating a "Muslim Database" over a year ago [AFP]
Donald Trump is discussing the possibility of introducing a registry to keep track of Muslims in the United States with his White House transition team, according to a senior advisor.

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, has told Reuters that Trump’s transition advisers are weighing the merits of such a registry.

Last November, Trump told the NBC News network that he would “certainly implement” a database to keep tabs on Muslims in America, adding that Muslims would be required to sign up.

A month later, he called for a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States”.

The Democratic party on Wednesday seized on Kobach's comment to bash Trump for a “Muslim registry.”

“Donald Trump’s proposed ‘Muslim registry’ is nothing less than institutionalized discrimination and a brazen assault on freedom of religion,” Democratic National Committee spokesman Mark Paustenbach said in a statement.

“The Trump team has clearly forgotten history and they’re already dooming their own chances of success by repeating the worst mistakes of the past. This is a shameful and dangerous start, and they will be held accountable.”

Talk of the Muslim registry comes amid reports that notorious Islamophobic conspiracy theorist Frank Gaffney is advising Trump’s transition team.

The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times reported on Tuesday night that Frank Gaffney, a former official in the administration of Ronald Reagan was involved with the transition team.

The reports have been denied by both Trump’s campaign and Gaffney, who told the US news outlet Politico: “I look forward to helping the President-elect and the national security-minded team he is assembling in whatever way I can.”

Gaffney has peddled numerous conspiracy theories about Muslims, including alleging that the Muslim Brotherhood is attempting a takeover in the US and that President Barack Obama is a Muslim.

In 2012, Gaffney’s right-wing think tank, The Center for Security Policy (CSP), accused Hillary Clinton's key advisor Huma Abedin, a Muslim of Indian and Pakistani descent, of being a secret Muslim Brotherhood agent.

This drew huge criticism from Democrats and Republicans alike, including from former Republican presidential nominee John McCain.

Due to its hard line views, the CSP has even been banned by the Conservative Political Action Conference [CPAC], which meets annually in Washington D.C.