Germany authorised Egypt weapons agreements in Merkel government's dying days: report

Germany authorised Egypt weapons agreements in Merkel government's dying days: report
2 min read
17 December, 2021
News of a Germany-Egypt deal for aerial protection systems and warships has angered some Germans, due to Egypt's participation in the devastating Yemen war and its dismal rights record at home
The Bundestag received a letter concerning the agreements on 7 December, the day before Olaf Sholz became leader [fhm/Getty]

Germany approved multiple weapons sales to Egypt in the dying days of former Chancellor Angela Merkel's government, according to a German newspaper report.

Berlin's parliament, the Bundestag, received a letter concerning the agreements from Peter Altmaier, Merkel's economic minister, on 7 December, the day before Social Democrat Olaf Sholz became Germany's leader, Der Spiegel said.

Altmaier's letter reveals 16 Diehl Defence aerial protection systems and three MEKO A-200 EN warships were given the go-ahead for transfer to Cairo, as was a submarine deal with Singapore.

The news has prompted outrage among some Germans due to Egypt's participation in the devastating Yemen war and its dismal human record at home.

Senior German Green party MP Agnieszka Brugger hit out at agreements made by a government that was "in [its] last hours".

Brugger said that the current government, to which the Green Party belongs, probably wouldn't have gone ahead with the agreements.

Senior Christian figures have expressed disapproval for these sorts of weapons sales too.

Christians are a key electorate for the Christian Democratic Union and its sister party the Christian Social Union in Bavaria.

Now the country's main opposition party, they seek to rebuild after two decades of Merkel at the top of its ranks.

The Social Democrats, Green Party and their coalition partner the Free Democratic Party have said they will put in place a "restrictive weapons export policy", especially concerning nations participating in the Yemen war.