Jordan's Brotherhood: 'We'll be here for ever'

Jordan's Brotherhood: 'We'll be here for ever'
2 min read
25 February, 2015
The head of the Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan has warned the state against trying to undermine the group, and called on those recently expelled to return to the fold.
Brotherhood members in Jordan come from all segments of society, leaders say [AFP]
The head of the Muslim Brotherhood in Jordan [Ar] has sent the Jordanian regime a message, warning it against trying to undermine the group.

Hamman Said was speaking at the Brotherhood's national forum at the Islamic Action Front offices, the group's political wing, on 25 February.


The Brotherhood in Jordan is at the peak of an internal crisis, which it blames on the Amman administration.

Said also warned a group of "reformer" leaders and former members expelled from the Brotherhood two weeks ago not to conspire against the group. They were welcome to re-join the organisation, he said.

The expelled group, led by former leader Abdul Majeed Thneibat, were kicked out for submitting a request to the government to renew the group's license. The Brotherhood leadership viewed this as a conspiracy against them, contravening the group's rules - the executive office is meant to be responsible for dealing with official bodies.
     The Brotherhood in Jordan is at the peak of an internal crisis, which it blames on the Amman administration.

 

Said accused the group of acting on the government's behalf, and argued that the government's attempts to reduce the role of the group were actually strengthening it.

"The Brotherhood will be here forever. It does not need a license because it is a social, political, and professional asset," he added.

Addressing the Jordanian government, Said said the Brotherhood had supported the regime even as the Arab Spring ignited much of the region. He also argued that the group could help cement national unity, as its members come from all segments of society.

Amman is reportedly under pressure from Egypt and the UAE to ban the Brotherhood in Jordan. Jordanian officials, however, say there is no plan to ban or disband the group even though it has been officially estranged from the state for years.

This article is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.