Moroccan mosques go green ahead of climate summit

Moroccan mosques go green ahead of climate summit
2 min read
07 September, 2016
The initiative could result in a 40 percent reduction in energy costs in 15,000 mosques across the country.
King Mohammed VI has pursued a proactive stance towards environmental awareness in Morocco

Morroco is set to launch an ambitious initiative to turn its mosques green in preparation for hosting the COP22 climate conference in two months.

The move is intended to symbolise the Kingdom’s commitment to clean energy and comes with cooperation from the Ministry of Endowments and Islamic Affairs.

It is hoped that the initiative will result in a 40 percent reduction in energy costs in the 15,000 mosques, spread across the country.

Studies show that energy consumption can be cut by 60 percent, with estimates showing savings of up to 68 percent at Rabat's majestic As-Sunna mosque.

This reduction can be achieved through energy-saving lighting, photovoltaic electricity generation and solar water heating, all without harming the appearance of the mosques.

SIE, Morocco’s state energy investment company, has additionally stressed that the initiative could have a "strong social impact" through the creation of 5,000 jobs and a new growth market.

SIE, Morocco’s state energy investment company, has emphasised that the initiative could have a 'strong social impact' through the creation of 5,000 jobs and a new growth market

German development organisation GIZ, which supports the project, describes it as a "win-win" situation that will also raise awareness of renewable and efficient energy in Morocco, in comments published by AFP.

King Mohammed VI has pursued a proactive stance towards environmental awareness in Morocco, and in November Marrakesh is set to host the COP22 world climate conference.

In 2009, Mohammad launched an ambitious plan to develop renewable energy sources to compensate for the country’s lack of sources of hydrocarbons with the aim of eventually supporting over 50 percent of the country’s energy needs through renewable sources.

However Morocco is yet to ratify the Paris agreement signed by 195 countries last year to battle global warming, a central challenge ahead of the COP22.