States of Journalism: A growing demand in a shrinking space

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2 min read
15 July, 2022
The New Arab Voice is our weekly podcast bringing you compelling stories from the Middle East, North Africa and beyond.

Motivated by the recent killing of journalist Shireen Abu Akleh in occupied Palestine and what many have described as double standards in international media narratives on Ukraine versus the Middle East, The New Arab's States of Journalism series is a sustained, ongoing exploration of freedom, repression, and accountability in MENA and beyond, in global media landscapes.

On this week's episode of The New Arab Voice, we're examine two stories from the Middle East and the ongoing struggle to secure press freedoms.

First we explore the rise and repression of citizen journalists in Egypt. 

When the uprisings against President Hosni Mubarak began, numerous activists took it upon themselves to document the violations being committed, report on the changing landscape of the country, and the issues that mattered most to Egyptians. 

Since the overthrow of the president, online space and the abilities of citizen journalists have been severely repressed by the government of President Sisi. 

We spoke with Dr. Courtney Radsch (@courtneyr), a journalist and a fellow at the UCLA Institute for Technology Law and Policy. Courtney focuses on the intersection of technology, media, and rights, and is the author of Cyberactivism and Citizen Journalism in Egypt: Digital Dissidence and Political Change.

Secondly, we examined the changes to press freedoms seen in Tunisia. 

The uprisings in Tunisia, and what followed after, were often held up as an example for the rest of the Arab world to follow. But, in the intervening years, the north African country has taken worrying steps back to a one-man rule system. 

Amid the political changes and uncertainty, Fadil Aliriza (@FadilAliriza) founded Meshkal (@meshkaltn), an online independent news outlet.

We spoke with Fadil about Meshkal, the challenges they have faced, the changing media landscape in Tunisia, and what the future may hold for press freedoms in the country. 

You can purchase Dr. Courtney Radsch's book here

You can support Meshkal via their Pateron page

This article is part of The New Arab’s States of Journalism series, a sustained exploration of freedom, repression, and accountability in MENA and global media landscapes. Read more of the series’ articles here.

 

This podcast is written and produced by Hugo Goodridge (@hugogoodridge). Theme music by Omar al-Fil (@elepheel). 

Other music by Blue Dot Sessions.

To get in touch with the producers, follow then tweet us at @TheNewArabVoice or email hugo.goodridge@alaraby.co.uk