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The New Arab & agencies

Syrian regime claim US-led coalition jets struck military positions

An artillery piece was reportedly destroyed in the strike [Getty-file photo]

Date of publication: 3 February, 2019

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Syrian regime troops were hit in a US-led coalition airstrike, Damascus has claimed.

US-led coalition jets struck Syrian regime military positions in the east of the country, state media claimed on Sunday.

The alleged strikes took place at al-Sokkariyeh, close to al-Bukamal in Deir az-Zour province, where separate Syrian regime and US-backed Arab-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) military campaigns against the Islamic State group are taking place.

"US coalition aircraft launched an aggression this evening against one of the Syrian Arab army formations operating in the Albukamal area in the southeastern countryside of Deir al-Zour," Syrian state news agency SANA reported.

It said that two soldiers were injured and an artillery piece destroyed.

The US-led coalition has not commented on the claims, but has denied previous claims by the Syrian regime that it has struck non-IS targets in eastern Syria.

SDF forces are laying siege to the last few hamlets under IS control, following a years' long campaign to oust the militants from easter Syria.

International coalition airstrikes have been key to this campaign with Russia - which backs Bashar al-Assad - and the US sharing lines of communication to avoid clashes.

The US have reportedly struck Syrian regime and Russian forces in Deir az-Zour, after pro-Assad forces launched an offensive on SDF positions, killing scores of fighters.

Assad has said he seeks to capture the whole of Syria, including areas controlled by the SDF. 

President Donald Trump's announcement that the US military would be withdrawing from Syria sparked fears that the SDF territories could come under offensives by Turkey or the Syrian regime.



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