Study: Tuktuks inject millions of dollars into Egyptian economy

Study: Tuktuks inject millions of dollars into Egyptian economy
2 min read
20 August, 2015
A recent study shows tuktuks, three-wheeled motorised vehicles used as taxis in Egypt generate employment and inject millions of dollars into the economy, despite government efforts to ban them.
Tuktuks provide affordable transportation for Egyptians in densely populated urban districts and villages [Getty]

An Egyptian consulting firm has released a study on tuktuks, revealing that they serve millions of citizens every day and create thousands jobs for unemployed young people.

N Gage Consulting published a report entitled “The Tuktuk: An Opportunity for Development” that said the three-wheelers are a daily means of transport for over 30 million Egyptians and create 200 thousand job opportunities a year.

“Tuktuks have spread because they have provided practical and inexpensive solutions to many of the problems Egypt is suffering from. They have created jobs, are a source of income for many Egyptians and have solved transport problems around the country in particular rural areas,” the study said.

“Tuktuk drivers bring in 3bn Egyptian pounds ($383ml) each month, which is reinjected into the economy through purchasing goods and services that directly and indirectly contribute to creating jobs in various economic sectors,” it added.

The lobbying outfit’s paper has been released as the government refuses to license and regulate the popular three-wheelers - without a clear reason.

See Also: Photo gallery: Egypt bans tuktuks in central Cairo

Last month, the governor of Cairo banned tuktuks from the streets of central Cairo's streets, violators will be fined and their vehicles will be confiscated.

Despite the government’s tuktuk aversion, Pime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab recently said Egypt's young people should consider driving tuktuks as their professions.

The Federation of Egyptian Industries recently announced it is looking into the possibilities of a national manufacturing strategy for tuktuks, which would boost the local content of the product from 20 percent to 60 percent.

Tuktuks provide affordable transportation for Egyptians in densely populated urban districts and villages.